Oral Surgery After Care Instructions

Topic: Dental Implant Recovery

Topic: Wisdom Tooth Recovery

Topic: Tooth Extraction Recovery


Dental Implant Recovery


ORAL HYGIENE
Keeping your mouth clean after surgery is essential to proper healing. Use the mouth rinse directed by your doctor, starting the day after surgery. Continue your regular tooth brushing, starting the day after surgery, but be careful not to disturb the surgical site with your toothbrush. After 7 days, and during the remaining healing period, brush the metal healing abutments(s) during regular oral hygiene. Do not smoke or use smokeless tobacco, as these significantly inhibit the healing of the implant(s).

ANTIBIOTICS
Antibiotics are not routinely prescribed, however, if you are provided with one, please take as directed.

NAUSEA
Nausea is most often caused by the stronger narcotic pain medications. Preceding these medications with food can reduce nausea. Try taking small sips of carbonated beverages and minimize the use of the narcotic pain medications.

UNUSUAL CONDITIONS
If any of the following conditions should occur during the post-operative period, please call the clinic:
1.  Fever over 101 degrees.
2.  Severe, hard swelling after the third post-operative day.
3.  Severe, bright red bleeding that you cannot control with the use of gauze or tea bags
4.  Rash, difficulty breathing, or severe vomiting.
5.  Prolonged severe pain that is not relieved after several doses of pain medication.
6.  Continued numbness of lip, chin, or tongue, persisting the day after surgery.
7.  Any mobility of the implant or healing cap during the healing period.

Wisdom Tooth Recovery


CARE OF SURGERY SITE
•  The gentle pressure of biting on gauze helps to limit bleeding. Most areas stop bleeding within 30 minutes to 3 hours. Change the gauze as needed when it becomes saturated. It is normal to have blood-tinged saliva for up to 24 hours.
•  Swelling may occur after your surgery and should not be cause for concern. Swelling may reach its peak 36-72 hours after surgery and typically resolves over the course of a week.
•  Apply ice packs to the outside of the face for the first 12-24 hours (20 minutes on-20 minutes off) to help minimize swelling. Sleeping with your head elevated may limit the degree of swelling.
•  If sutures were placed, they will dissolve on their own.
•  Please try to avoid smoking after surgery, as it delays healing. Smoking in the first 2 days after surgery may increase the risk of dry socket by 30%.

DIET
•  Eat foods that are soft at first, such as applesauce, yogurt, soups, noodle dishes, and egg dishes. Slowly advance your diet back to normal based on your comfort level.
•  While your mouth is numb, avoid chewing and use caution with hot temperatures, as you could bite your lip or burn your mouth.
•  Avoid items such as popcorn, nuts, and seeds that may become lodged in the surgical sites.

PAIN MANAGEMENT
•  Pain management is most effective when pain relievers are taken before the local anesthesia wears off.
•  Anti-inflammatory medication, such as Ibuprofen, Naproxen, and Aspirin are the most effective over-the-counter pain relievers for tooth extraction pain. These may be taken with acetaminophen. If a prescription for pain medicine has been given, take as directed on the bottle.
•  If you need a refill on your prescription of narcotic pain medicine, please call during our office hours.
•  Do not combine narcotic pain medications with alcohol. Many prescription pain medications cause drowsiness and must not be taken if you are driver a car, operating machinery, or performing tasks that require concentration.

ORAL HYGIENE
•  Keeping your mouth clean after surgery is very important.
•  Brush your teeth normally, avoiding any areas that are sore or tender.
•  If you were provided a prescription rinse, use as directed or use a salt water rinse made of 1/2 teaspoon of salt in 8 ounces of water and gently swish 2-3 times daily starting the day after surgery.

ACTIVITY
•  It is important to rest the day of your procedure, especially if you were sedated. Advance your activity as you can tolerate over the next few days.

ANTIBIOTICS
•  Antibiotics are not routinely prescribed, however, if you are provided with one, please take as directed.

DRY SOCKET (ALVEOLAR OSTEITIS)
•  A dry socket occurs when the tooth socket either fails to form a blood clot or the clot disintegrates which can result in delayed healing. It is not a serious condition or an infection, but it can be quite painful.
•  Dry socket presents with a distinct severe throbbing/aching pain in the jaw that often radiates toward the ear and forward along the jaw. This typically starts between 3 to 5 days after the procedure.
•  Dry socket will resolve on its own regardless of any treatment provided, but if pain relievers are inadequate, please contract our office, as an in-office treatment may help to decrease the pain.

TROUBLESHOOTING
•  If you experience bleeding lasting longer than 3 hours, bite on a moistened tea bag directly over the surgery site for 30-60 minutes. The tannins in black tea are most effective, green tea is somewhat effective, and herbal tea is ineffective. If bleeding is severe or lasts into the next day, notify our office.

•  Sutures typically take 5-10 days to fall out. Occasionally, they may fall out sooner, even the day of the procedure. This should not be cause for concern, as they are mainly used as an aid to limit bleeding immediately following the procedure.

•  Food particles will get into the surgical sites. This should not be cause for concern, as the saliva will break it down over time.

•  The socket may appear to have a white material in it or may appear as a deep hole in the tissue. This is normal. In general, we discourage closely inspecting the site and relying more on how the area feels to judge your progress.

UNUSUAL CONDITIONS
If any of the following conditions should occur during the post-operative period, please call the clinic:
1.  Fever over 101 degrees.
2.  Severe, hard swelling after the third post-operative day.
3.  Severe, bright red bleeding that you cannot control with the use of gauze or tea bags
4.  Rash, difficulty breathing, or severe vomiting.
5.  Prolonged severe pain that is not relieved after several doses of pain medication.
6.  Continued numbness of lip, chin, or tongue, persisting the day after surgery.

Tooth Extraction Recovery


CARE OF SURGERY SITE
The gentle pressure of biting on gauze helps to limit bleeding. Most areas stop bleeding within 30 minutes to 3 hours. Change the gauze as needed when it becomes saturated. It is normal to have blood-tinged saliva for up to 24 hours.

You may have some swelling that should not be cause for concern. The greatest swelling would peak 36-72 hours after surgery and then should gradually subside. If you wish to use ice, apply to the outside of the face for the first 12-24 hours. (20 minutes on- 20 minutes off).

If sutures were placed, in most cases they will dissolve on their own.

Please try to avoid smoking after surgery. Smoking delays healing and can cause bleeding and may also increase the risk of a dry socket.

DIET
•  Avoid chewing and food with hot temperatures until the numbness has disappeared.
•  Eat soft foods (ice cream, applesauce, noodles, egg dishes, soups, etc.) for the day and chew to the opposite side if possible. Advance your diet as you tolerate over the next few days.
•  Avoid items such as popcorn, nuts, and seeds that may get lodged in the sites.

PAIN MANAGEMENT
•  You will find better pain control by taking your first pain medication before the local anesthetic wears off.
•  You will take Aspirin, Ibuprofen, or Acetaminophen. If a prescription for pain medicine has been given, take as directed on the bottle.
•  If you need a refill on your prescription of narcotic pain medicine, please call during our office hours.

ACTIVITY
•  Light activity is advised the day of your surgery. Advance your activity as you tolerate.

ORAL HYGIENE
•  Keeping your mouth clean after surgery is very important. This will reduce the risk of post-operative infection.
•  You may brush your teeth starting the day after surgery with a soft toothbrush.
•  Use the rinse directed by your doctor OR 1/2 teaspoon of salt in 8 ounces of water and rinse 2-3 times daily starting the day AFTER surgery.

ANTIBIOTICS
•  Antibiotics are not routinely prescribed, however, if you are provided with one please take as directed.

DRY SOCKET (ALVEOLAR OSTEITIS)
•  A dry socket occurs when the tooth socket either fails to form a blood clot or the clot disintegrates which can result in delayed healing. It is not a serious condition or an infection, but it can be quite painful. Dry socket presents with a distinct severe throbbing/aching pain in the jaw that often radiates toward the ear and forward along the jaw. This typically starts between 3 to 5 days after the procedure.
•  Dry socket will resolve on its own regardless of any treatment provided, but if pain relievers are inadequate, please contract our office, as an in-office treatment may help to decrease the pain.

TROUBLESHOOTING
•  If you experience bleeding lasting longer than 3 hours, bite on a moistened tea bag directly over the surgery site for 30-60 minutes. The tannins in black tea are most effective, green tea is somewhat effective, and herbal tea is ineffective. If bleeding is severe or lasts into the next day, notify our office.

•  Sutures typically take 5-10 days to fall out. Occasionally, they may fall out sooner, even the day of the procedure. This should not be cause for concern, as they are mainly used as an aid to limit bleeding immediately following the procedure.

•  Food particles will get into the surgical sites. This should not be cause for concern, as the saliva will break it down over time.

•  The socket may appear to have a white material in it or may appear as a deep hole in the tissue. This is normal. In general, we discourage closely inspecting the site and relying more on how the area feels to judge your progress.

UNUSUAL CONDITIONS
If any of the following conditions should occur during the post-operative period, please call the clinic:
1.  Fever over 101 degrees.
2.  Severe, hard swelling after the third post-operative day.
3.  Severe, bright red bleeding that you cannot control with the use of gauze or tea bags
4.  Rash, difficulty breathing, or severe vomiting.
5.  Prolonged severe pain that is not relieved after several doses of pain medication.
6.  Continued numbness of lip, chin, or tongue, persisting the day after surgery.


Madison Oral Surgery & Dental Implants

Madison Location
5801 Research Park Blvd. Suite #110
Madison, WI 53719 MAP
P. (608) 960-7650
F. (608) 274-9224

Monona Location
612 River Place
Monona, WI 53716 MAP
P. (608) 960-7970
F. (608) 222-1145

Email Us
info@madisonoralsurgeons.com

Connect
Health Grades
Rate us and review other patient satisfaction rates.
Madison Google+
Read and write reviews.
Monona Google+
Read and write reviews.
Facebook
Stay connected with us!
Yelp
Read and write reviews.


Home  | About Us  | For Patients  | Dental Implants  | Oral Surgery  | Contact Us  | Testimonials  | Meet the Doctors  | Why Choose MOSDI?  | Our New Name  | Wisdom Teeth Removal  | Tooth Extractions  | Sedation for Procedures  | Advanced Technology  | Impacted Canines  | Dental Trauma  | Oral Pathology  | After Care Instructions  | Patient Forms  | Insurance Info  | Dental Blog  | Madison Office  | Monona Office  | Study Club  | Referring Doctors  | Before & After Gallery  | Benefits of Dental Implants  | How Dental Implants Replace Teeth  | All-On-4 Treatment Concept / Teeth In A Day  | Why Choose An Expert?




Madison Oral Surgery & Dental Implants | www.madisonoralsurgeons.com | (608) 960-7650
5801 Research Park Blvd., Suite 110, Madison, WI 53719



 

 

Copyright © 2014-2017 Madison Oral Surgery & Dental Implants and WEO MEDIA. All rights reserved.  Sitemap | Links